Session 5

Session 5 was to take place in October, and like many DMs, I wanted to try and do something spooky in preparation for Halloween. Due to school and work, I didn’t have much time to prepare anything new, so I decided to insert the Blind Demon scenario from Session 3.5 into the campaign. This was intended not only to provide a horror-themed scenario, but also to provide another group to playtest the adventure that I had created and was particularly proud of. I knew that the adventure would last about four or five hours, and our monthly sessions tend to run eight or nine (including breaks), so I added some extra content that the group could explore once the demon encounter was over.

The group was enjoying breakfast at the Lion’s Blaze Inn and Tavern when the matriarch, Sonia DeMarcus, burst into the establishment looking for Sybil. She explained that she had left her house to go into town and retrieve supplies because it was her servants’ days off. However, when she returned she glimpsed a monster inside of her house, and in her fear she ran to find the only friend she had. Unfortunately, the players were not particularly fond of Sonia (and their opinion did not improve over the course of the adventure), but knowing that the lady was rich was enough to motivate them to help. This moment was a particularly tricky part for me, because when I ran this adventure last I simply dropped the group into the scenario, but I couldn’t do that to a pre-existing group, so I took my chances, hoping that the promise of gold would be enough to motivate them.

Unlike the first time I ran the Blind Demon scenario, the adventure ended up being true horror experience, instead of a suspenseful and mysterious one. (In the months since, my players have claimed that the trailer for the new horror film A Quiet Place reminds them heavily of what occurred in the house with the Blind Demon). The group was anxious, unsure of what they were about to experience, and were constantly on edge while they prowled through the house. Caileth and Lei in particular said more than one prayer to their deities; this is particularly profound because neither of them are religious, not even the cleric ironically. The party’s discovery of the secret passage led to some clever thinking on their part, allowing them to occasionally bypass the creature that they knew would eviscerate them. However, they had some difficulty locating the candles crucial to the banishment, though much of this was likely due to their hesitance to go into the attic. This led to one particular instance where the PCs were trying to sneak up the stairs from the second floor into the attic, with the Blind Demon lurking on the bottom floor next to the stairs. Caileth, Solomon, and Lei all made it to the attic with no problem, but Reagan unfortunately rolled a 3 for Bel’s attempt, resulting in him tripping while trying to climb up the stairs. The enormous sound he made after tripping alerted the demon, forcing Bel to bolt to safety with the creature hot on his heels. He darted into the attic, the rest of his party slamming the door behind him. The Blind Demon pounded on the door, but alas his claws kept him from opening it, and he soon wandered away.

Eventually, with careful maneuvering and more than a little tiptoeing, the group made their way around the mansion, collecting the elements needed for the banishment and encountering the ghost of Vivian DeMarcus. The PCs realized that Peter, the son, was likely the demon who failed while trying to bring his sister back, and began to take on an even more unfavorable opinion of Sonia after finding Peter’s journal entries discussing his mom’s behavior since the passing of her daughter and husband. Finally, they assembled the ritual, lured the demon into the circle, and banished the demon from Peter’s body. The group returned to the tavern, reuniting Peter and his mother, though they confronted Sonia over her poor parenting skills despite her apparent mental instability. Sybil, angry at the group’s attitude towards her friend, defended Sonia from the group and took her back home. With that, the adventure of the Blind Demon came to an end for this band of adventurers.

A listing for warriors for hire was placed on the adventurer’s board, so the group grabbed the flyer and set out to meet the people responsible. A group of druids, known as the Glacius Tribe, were searching for protection for a yearly pilgrimage they embarked upon once a year. Elmyar, the leader of the tribe, was a tall moon elf with silvery blue skin and long, dark black hair. His husband, Thatoris, was an even taller wood elf who possessed long blond hair and pale skin. Elmyar was particularly flamboyant in demeanor, showing an enthusiasm for life that was balanced with his fierce loyalty to his people and a devotion to his love. Thatoris was the quiet calm in contrast to the druid leader, showing his age and his lack of sight through his caution and continuous close proximity to Elmyar. The group took a liking to the elves, and after an interview they signed a contract with them, promising to accompany them when they departed on their small journey a few days later.

With some time left in the day, the group took another flyer from the tavern, one that asked someone to stop a band of goblins who had taken to ransacking incoming merchants. After talking to the head of the merchants and being given a list of items that had been taken recently, the group set off to find where the goblins would set up shop. They quickly found the goblin cave and followed the creatures to the road where they would later ambush an unsuspecting merchant. Due to a not so great stealth role, the goblins noticed a few of the PCs, but because I for some reason like to play goblins in a Three Stooges/idiotic style, they didn’t care that these random humanoids were watching them. None of the party knew how this was going to go and were curious to see what the goblins had in mind, so they waited until a merchant came along. As the poor traveler drove his cart underneath the tree, the goblins launched themselves onto the man, distracting him while two hobgoblin buddies began grabbing items from the cart.

Finally, the group decided to intervene. And by “the group decided to intervene”, I mean Caileth decided to run up to the merchant, grab the goblin off of his face, and throw him into the snow. The other two goblins, seeing this, decided they wanted their turn, and promptly demanded that she throw them as well. A well-timed natural twenty resulted in the goblins being promptly launched into the forest. Meanwhile, the two hobgoblins were overpowered and tied up by the rest of the party. After assuring the merchant that he was okay and collecting the items the fiends had stolen, the group walked back to the capital and turned the goblins in to the guards. What was originally intended to be a combat encounter was solved with goofy shenanigans in true D&D fashion.

Overall, I really enjoyed this session, and I was grateful to get a chance to playtest the Blind Demon encounter again. There were a few definite things that I learned from the session, and it made me look at one particular type of encounter in a new light.

  • The same scenario will play out very differently with different characters, even if the players are the same

A big part of why I think this iteration of the Blind Demon scenario was a lot more tense was due to the fact that Eli was no longer playing a blood cleric. The blood cleric had the ability to use a creature’s blood to track it, but neither Caileth, nor anyone else in this group, had such an ability. This meant that the group had to be much more careful about the location of the demon at all times. Suddenly, the encounter became much more frightening, and potentially more lethal; it was some strange haunted house/slasher film that the PCs were trapped inside. Even to this day, my players still tell me that this was an incredibly terrifying adventure, which is the effect I was hoping to achieve, one that I don’t think I truly managed to find with the first group. It allowed me to realize that even minor character abilities can affect a scenario in ways that I had never imagined, and one of the most important things to do as a DM is have a basic understanding of how your PCs’ abilities work. That’s not to say you should have everything the players can do memorized; knowing exactly how the classes work should be up to the players. But knowing if your team has decent stealth, good range attacks, or, yes, the ability to track a monster through their blood can really help you as a DM determine what elements of a story will work best for your players, providing a nice challenge while still allowing them to feel heroic.

  • Social encounters can also have a victory condition

When I came up with the druid encounter, I didn’t really imagine a scenario where the group would fail to get the job once they met the druid leader. In retrospect, I would likely have made the encounter a little more serious, providing a more in-depth interview of the PCs and providing an option for them to “fail”. While a big part of the DM’s job is to ensure that the players feel like the heroes of the story, a realistic tale also doesn’t have the characters succeed at every angle. Building in a scenario where the players don’t have to work makes the players lazy and the characters Mary Sues/Gary Stus who are practically perfect at everything. I don’t necessarily regret not making this encounter trickier, but in retrospect it makes me want to try harder when designing social encounters, knowing that they can be just as unique and challenging as combat encounters or skill challenges if we as DMs allow them to be.

I really enjoyed this session, and although I can’t say it was an absolute favorite, it was a lot of fun and allowed me to learn some valuable things about my DMing style. Additionally, being able to try my hand at the horror genre in D&D was fun and refreshing. I still hope to keep playtesting my Blind Demon scenario, tweaking bits and pieces until it becomes a more well-rounded adventure. Until then, I am so pleased to keep adventuring with this awesome party of players and learning more and more as a DM.


Questions, comments, or concerns? Leave me a comment, or find me on Twitter @DandDDM.

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