Session 4

After having killed a dragon, looted a dungeon, and dispatched some thieves, my players were pretty confident in themselves. When session four came around, they knew that they could kick ass and take names and were ready to move on to bigger and better challenges. At the end of the third session they had informed me that they were going to be heading to the capital city of Vrotha, and as such I began to plan accordingly.

However, I had not anticipated exactly how thorough the players were going to be. The party had already scavenged some scales, blood, claws, teeth, horns, and an eye from the dragon when they returned from the dungeon, and as such I figured they would take what they had found and move on. Instead the group bought a carriage, went back to the dungeon, and began looting the body even further. Meat, gallbladder, kidneys, and anything else that could be torn from the corpse of the white dragon was quickly removed. I had planned out ahead of time the basic values for each piece and who would be most likely to buy what (or who could turn the items into what they wanted in certain cases), but these new items left me completely blindsided and scrambling to keep up.

The party made their way through the icy landscape of Vrotha to the capital city, Whitepoint. There the players entered and found the city separated into seven districts, each with its own purpose. First, they ventured into the merchant district, looking for people to buy the raw materials. A good charisma roll from Solomon meant that a large portion of the 18 pounds of dragon meat they possessed was bought by a doubting man named Quincy who was currently running Merle’s Meat Market. This exchange gave the group nearly a thousand gold, which combined with what they were given by Simone and Nikolai, the twins who run Augury and Alchemy (the newest and biggest magic shop in Vrotha), amounted to quite a large amount of gold. Solomon also asked the twins if they could do anything with the bile from the dragon, and the two promised to provide him with some options in a week once their alchemy book came in. Finally, the group commissioned some jewelry, a new bow, and some armor using the remainder of the dragon materials they possessed before finding their way to the library.

Caileth was particularly interested in the old book that the group had found in the final room of the ice dungeon. However, the journal was written in celestial, a nearly dead language in the realm of Dracia. This meant that in order to understand the knowledge hidden within the tome, they would need to hire the services of a professional translator. The Library of Vrotha, one of the biggest libraries in Dracia, was home to several professional translators, and Shae Jin, a young eager woman with a love for books took upon the case. However, the book was lengthy and the language was old, meaning that it would take about 30 days for Jin to translate it entirely. This meant that the party would need a place to stay.

Towards the center of the city sat The Lion’s Blaze Inn and Tavern (a reference to an Olan Rogers skit in the vein of RPGs), a place designed specifically (but secretly) for adventurers. Sybil, Tamara, and Martha, the ladies who own the inn, were former adventurers themselves, meaning that they knew exactly how important it was for young adventurers to have a space where they can get new quests and stay out of the eye of the disapproving government. The players found shelter there, paying in advance for thirty days room and board. Inside the tavern rested a secret board, filled with calls for help that potential heroes could pursue. Here the group found their first call to action in Whitepoint.

A group of shepherds had been losing sheep to a strange creature on the outskirts of the city. Despite the government’s insistence that citizens not rely on outside help, the farmers had gotten tired of their livestock being picked off and getting no military help, so they reached out to The Lion’s Blaze for assistance. When the PCs arrived at the house of the head shepherd, they were informed about the situation and instructed to rid the capital of whatever creature had been taking the sheep. With some hesitation, the group set out to the outskirts of the city to see what they could do to help the poor farmers.

Using the corpse of an old sheep, wool, and some tar, the group created a dummy to trick the creature so that they could kill it. After waiting for some time, the creature, a “terracabra” (a modified version of the legendary Chupacabra), swooped down and grabbed the decoy. The PCs followed the creature, attacking it and forcing it to fight back. Solomon found himself being carried away in the claws of the monster, and fell several feet as Caileth struck the killing blow with a blast of sacred flame from the circlet she had found in the ice dungeon. After destroying the terracabra, they returned to the shepherds, and were rewarded with 150 gold, an immovable rod, and a sheep named after each of them. Satisfied with their work, the adventurers returned to the tavern for a night of rest, promising to continue fulfilling quests through the rest of their stay in the city.

This particular session was certainly one of the more relaxed ones we have had, even since the time of this session. Since the group spent much of their time either scavenging materials or shopping, much of the session was spent focusing on the individual characters’ needs and the roleplay between them and NPCs. Nonetheless, the session was informative and I feel like I came away from it with important knowledge, not just DM knowledge but that pertaining to my world, my players, and their characters.

  • It is perfectly acceptable for players to ignore a branching plot point

For many people, D&D is a way that they can escape from the rigorous cycle of real life and the demands placed upon them. Being a DM that does not railroad your player not only provides better storytelling potential but allows your world to become an escape for your players. This means that if you set up a potential plot point and your players show no interest in it, that is completely okay. On their journey to Whitepoint, my players came across the town of Rakski (from Session 1.5) and found the bare traces of a new plotline building. However, the group expressed no interest, spent the night in the tavern, and went on their merry way. My players were not motivated to investigate further, and that is perfectly fine. The whole point of a sandbox campaign is to provide option for the players and to allow them to feel like they are immersed in a real world. This being said, if players ignore a plotline, it is okay (but not necessary) for them to see the consequences of skipping it. Keep in mind that “consequence” and “punishment” are not the same thing. If the players ignore a farmer whose chickens keep getting eaten by foxes, that doesn’t mean they have to see his body drug down the streets in a cart full of people dead from the plague. Rather, you can twist the plot so that the farmer overcomes the foxes on his own, taming the foxes into pets, and when your cleric decides she wants a pet fox the farmer can look her dead in the eyes and tell her no because they didn’t help him when he needed it most. The consequences can be a punishment, but they don’t have to be, and they can be negative without being punishing, but they don’t have to be. When running a sandbox campaign in particular, an important thing to remember is that the best way to make the players feel immersed in the game is to remind them that their actions have weight. Don’t panic if the players aren’t interested in one particular plotline you were sure they would take the bait for, and don’t punish them either, especially if it’s their characters who are not interested rather than the players.

  • Be careful with rare items and creatures in your world.

In the world of Dracia, dragons are extremely rare, so much so that they are considered extinct or merely fairytales by the people of the world. When I decided this in my worldbuilding phase, I hadn’t considered the potential of throwing a dragon at my players, nor had I thought of the ramifications of them scavenging and selling the parts. What was originally a storytelling element became a way for my players to get quite a bit of gold-and at fourth level nonetheless. Normally, the people in Whitepoint would have simply believed that the players were lying to them (with the exception of Simone and Nikolai, who are well-trained in the history of magical creatures and the arcane arts), making it hard for any of the dragon parts to be sold. However, thanks to some clever thinking and talking by Solomon, his high charisma, and some lucky rolls, they were able to convince the gentleman at the meat market to buy the meat off of them. Because I had made one thing extremely rare, I had inadvertently made the players far more powerfully financially then I had intended to. The important thing to remember is not to panic and try to undo what you just did, as that will leave the players feeling frustrated and robbed-literally and figuratively. Rather, allow for other opportunities to arise, such as a market or shop with cool trinkets that allows the players to spend their hard-earned gold on something that they like. You are here to tell the player’s story, not your own, so allow the players to learn, grow, ad gather some gold-they’ll feel much more like accomplished adventurers and heroes in the end.

This session was one of the least memorable ones we had played so far simply due to the lack of intense combat or complicated puzzles. Yet it was useful and necessary; the intensity of a necromancer and a dragon back to back was a bit much for the players, so providing them with an outlet for shopping and roleplay helped to revitalize them. Additionally, their commissioning of items required some time for the items to be made, tying the group down to one spot for a small portion of time as I began to plot out the next leg of the campaign. This strange bit of a lull was the perfect spot for the next portion of the heroes’ journeys to begin.

 

Notable quotes from the session:

  • Me (as an old man): Helloooo??

Caileth: Oh… that’s not what I expected.

Old man: Well, you’re not what I was expecting either, but we don’t always get what we want, do we?? *Slams door*

  • Eli: Can I use spiritual weapon to make a sheep-shaped bomb?

*AKA the moment the cleric officially broke the Dungeon Master*

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Questions, comments, or concerns? Leave a comment below or find me on Twitter @DandDDM.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s