Session 3.5

After my group’s third session, I was starting to get more comfortable with DMing. Thus when the DM from the group that I generally play in asked me to DM a one-shot, I felt ready to take on the challenge. However, the scenario in front of me required a bit of an adjustment from the games that I usually ran, and I wanted to challenge myself, so I set to work to create a one-shot that I hoped would be fun, unique, and scary.

When I played with my other group, we ran generally from 12-4 because we got together on Fridays or Saturdays, meaning that I had to leave for work. Every time I had run a session prior to this, I had a good six or seven hours to work with and no solid end time to worry about. This time I knew that I needed a concise adventure that could be wrapped up in one session and take about 3 hours (figuring in time for eating and restroom breaks). But I struggled with a good plot thread, a concept to use in the session. I have never been particularly good at creating unique ideas from scratch, and as such I was at a loss for a while.

Around this time, Sagas of Sundry: Dread was airing on Geek & Sundry’s Project Alpha. I had been eagerly watching the episodes week by week, clinging to the unique characters and air of suspense surrounding the series. As I drove to work one day, I found my mind toying with the idea of a horror one-shot. However, I have always been a weakling when it comes to horror entertainment; if I couldn’t watch a horror movie then how could I expect to provide a suspenseful and scary D&D scenario? I was about to pass on the idea when a thought struck my head.

Out of nowhere, the idea for a monster popped into my head. It was tall, lanky, with enormous arms and legs. Its head was pale, and nearly featureless. Skin was stretched over where eyes should lay, and two thin slits rested where a nose might be. A grin, devoid of lips but filled with sharp teeth, was framed by dark horns that emerged from the sides of the creature’s head and curved around to stick out next to the mouth. The pale skin at the head gradually fades into a pitch-black color, allowing the creature’s strange cloven feet to blend into the darkness. Finally, where fingers should have existed on the creature’s hands, instead there were lengthy thin claws, dragging behind the evil as it moved. To me, the creature was terrifying, and to this day I still am unsure how the idea for it popped into my head.

Once the demon popped into my head, the rest of the scenario quickly fell into place. In order to keep the scenario contained, I decided that the group would have been asked to investigate a monster inside the house of a rich elderly lady. Once inside, the house will have been transported to a pocket dimension with no exit, forcing the group to stay inside the house until the mystery was solved. The basic plot would be that the son of the older lady had been trying to bring his younger sister back to life, but had accidentally summoned a demon and subsequently been possessed. Over the course of the session, the group would be given opportunity to uncover the mystery behind “The Blind Demon” and potentially exorcise the demon from the body of the son.

The party consisted of a monk, a barbarian, a rogue, and a cleric, all at fifth level. Since it was a one-shot, I wasn’t terribly concerned with the characters and their abilities when setting up the scenario, although there were multiple moments where the PCs’ skills came in handy. In order to start the session quickly and ensure we had enough time to play, I essentially info-dumped the scenario on to the group, telling them enough details about the house, the lady who hired them, and the creature that resided within. While I would never have done this in the middle of an actual session, it worked for a group like this, involved in a one-shot and short on time. The group gave no pushback, and when I essentially dropped them off at the house they hit the ground running.

Once inside, the group found a pool of blood in the center of the hallway. Lying next to the blood was a piece of paper torn from a book, which held information about a specific demon and the details about performing an exorcism, as well as the words “HELP” written in blood. The cleric, actually a blood cleric, used his ability to connect the blood to the originator, and thus the group knew the location of the Blind Demon. Using the list of required materials on the piece of paper they had found, the group set off on a mad dash to find the ingredients, avoid the demon, and save the son.

Going into the session, I had very specific ideas of how I thought the entire situation would go, which is, as a DM, one of the biggest mistakes you can make. Still, I felt that the session went well, and to this day I am incredibly proud of this one-shot. I hope to continue working on this one-shot, playtesting it and tweaking it, then eventually publishing it on DMs Guild one day. But until that moment comes, it is important to reflect on what I learned from this session, both as a DM and as a content creator.

  • Your PCs might have abilities that circumvent elements of your story-and that’s okay

I hadn’t realized when creating this session that Eli’s character was going to have the ability to sense where the Blind Demon was at all time. At first it threw me off guard, but I was able to adapt to a certain extent. However, this ability did inherently change the nature of the game. Instead of being a straight up horror/haunted house type of story, it morphed into a suspenseful strategy situation. The group knew exactly where the Blind Demon was at all times, meaning that they had to carefully plan every move, every step to ensure that they did not run into the creature and endanger their lives. While this was an unexpected occurrence, it was a welcome one, and reminded me that as a DM the most important abilities are adapt, overcome, and improvise.

  • Repurposing monsters can be useful, but do so carefully

When I came up with the Blind Demon, I knew that I would have a hard time finding something that matched what I wanted as far as stats. I went into the Monster Manual looking for something to reskin that seemed powerful and frightening, but also matched the physicality of the demon. I settled on the Goristro, a demon itself, to fill in for my creature. The goristro has an ability called “Charge” that allows it to gore a target with its horns if it can move at least fifteen feet straight towards the target before it hits. Originally, the goristro had two fist attacks and one hoof attack, but I changed it to two claw attacks and one horn attack. What I adjusted on the monster felt like it held little difference because of how I intended the adventure to play out, which was a tremendous mistake on my part.

The goristro is a monster with a challenge rating of 17, an encounter which would be quite deadly for a group of four level-five adventurers. This might seem like madness, but when I picked the monster, I had a purpose. I wanted the Blind Demon to be a fearsome creature, a horrible monster that none would care to face. Because the demon was actually the son of the lady that had recruited the adventurers, I wanted to players to save the son and not kill him. I had hoped that the “HELP” on the paper found in the hallway at the beginning would lead them to that conclusion on their own, but I hoped that by making the demon a horrendously powerful creature I would force the players to avoid combat. At one point however, the players got caught in the same room as the demon, and instead of running, they decided to fight. I was worried about killing the players, so after a couple rounds of combat, I had the demon run away. While it saved the players, it weakened the story. I realized after this that it was important to allow room in the scenario for the players to defeat the demon, to kill the son, and that in order to make this scenario better I would have to rework the demon to provide more versatility in the outcome.

  • Creating unique props can help draw the players into the story

When I concocted the idea of the scenario, I wanted the paper that the PCs found to be a real piece of paper that the players could look at. On one side, the paper contained background information about the Blind Demon and its origin, as well as how to summon it, while the other side held the instructions and materials for how to banish it. I typed up the information on a plain piece of paper then asked my mom to help me age it. She used brown and tan paints to give the paper an older look, smudged some of the ink, wrinkled the page, and tore some of the edges. To lend the page a more horrific look, she mixed up more paint to look like blood, splattering it across the paper and tracing the word “HELP” in thin bloody letters. Finally, she drew a six-pointed symbol on the bottom corner, the symbol that the group would need to make to banish the demon, and tore that portion from the rest of the page. The prop was wonderful, scary, and engaging. My players knew immediately that it was important to their quest, skimmed it for clues, and began a hunt for the section that was torn away. Having such a unique prop immediately immersed the players in the story and helped to establish the atmosphere I wanted, that of a sense of urgency and suspense.

To this day, I have run the Blind Demon scenario twice, and I hope to continue to keep running it with different groups, fine tuning it and playtesting it. Eventually I want to work out the problems with the scenario, write it out properly, and publish it for others to use. I am incredibly proud of this scenario, and each time I have run it so far it teaches me powerful and unique lessons, both as a DM and as a content creator. It is important to remember when running the game that above all else, the most vital thing you can do as a DM is to not set expectations for how a scenario will go. The more of an idea you have for how the situation should go, the less likely you will be able to adapt to the players and their needs. Whether you are running a premade adventure or creating something yourself, remember that adaptability and improvisation are your two greatest assets in the world of DMing.

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Question, comments, or concerns? Leave me a comment below or find me on Twitter @DandDDM.

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